top of page

Gruppo per professionisti

Pubblico·10 membri
Ryan Myers
Ryan Myers

Time To Get On With It…  The Vacation Is Over.


More and more jurisdictions are passing laws requiring employers to provide paid leave to employees, and the COVID-19 pandemic has only accelerated this trend. When new laws are enacted, employers often have questions about the impact on their existing policies. Here are answers to some frequently asked questions on paid sick leave, vacation, and paid time off.




Time to get on with It…  The Vacation is Over.



A: No federal, state, or local law requires employers to provide paid vacation. However, some jurisdictions have enacted laws requiring employers to provide paid leave that employees can use for any purpose, including vacation. For example, Maine requires employers with more than 10 employees to provide paid time off that can be used for any reason. Nevada has a similar law that applies to employers with 50 or more employees.


Despite the absence in laws requiring paid vacation, it remains one of the most common employee benefits. More than 90 percent of full-time employees receive paid vacation time, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Providing paid vacation, and developing a culture that encourages employees to use their time, can help attract and retain employees and bolster productivity, particularly in these unprecedented times.


A: Instead of having separate policies for vacation, sick, and other types of leave, many employers offer a single PTO policy under which employees can use accrued time off for any purpose. For example, you may offer 14 days of PTO per year that employees can use for any reason. Under this policy, one employee could use 10 days for a vacation, another three days when they get sick later in the year, and the remaining time off to care for their child, whose school was closed due to a snowstorm. Other employees may use the time differently to meet their specific needs and circumstances.


A: Some states explicitly prohibit policies that force employees to forfeit accrued, unused vacation (also known as use-it-or-lose-it policies). In these cases, employers must generally allow employees to carry over accrued but unused vacation from year to year, or pay employees for the unused time at the end of the year. Similarly, in these states, employers are required to pay out any accrued, unused vacation at the time of separation.


A: Under many of the paid sick leave laws, no additional leave would be required if the PTO policy met the requirements listed in the answer above. When implementing your PTO policy, to help your employees manage their time off, clearly communicate what they can use PTO for, how it accrues, available balances, and the other requirements of your plan. Depending on the circumstances, the employee here may qualify for sick leave (typically unpaid) under a different law. For example, the federal Family and Medical Leave Act requires employers with 50 or more employees to provide unpaid leave to eligible employees for specified family, medical, and military reasons. Many states have similar laws that cover employers with fewer employees. Check your applicable laws to ensure compliance.


Sick leave laws don't typically require that employers pay for unused sick leave when an employee leaves the company. However, if you use your PTO policy to meet sick leave requirements, in some states, such as California, you would be required to pay out all unused PTO at the time of separation. This could mean you would face additional costs paying for unused sick time if you bundled your sick leave into your PTO rather than if you offered separate sick leave. In some states, this may also be true if the employer uses a vacation policy to satisfy the sick leave law.


Note: Seattle's paid sick leave law requires employers with 250 or more full-time equivalent employees to carry over more time off if they maintain a PTO policy instead of a standalone sick leave policy (108 hours versus 72 hours).


There is no legal requirement in California that an employer provide its employees with either paid or unpaid vacation time. However, if an employer does have an established policy, practice, or agreement to provide paid vacation, then certain restrictions are placed on the employer as to how it fulfills its obligation to provide vacation pay. Under California law, earned vacation time is considered wages, and vacation time is earned, or vests, as labor is performed. For example, if an employee is entitled to two weeks (10 work days) of vacation per year, after six months of work he or she will have earned five days of vacation. Vacation pay accrues (adds up) as it is earned, and cannot be forfeited, even upon termination of employment, regardless of the reason for the termination. (Suastez v. Plastic Dress Up (1982) 31 C3d 774) An employer can place a reasonable cap on vacation benefits that prevents an employee from earning vacation over a certain amount of hours. (Boothby v. Atlas Mechanical (1992) 6 Cal.App.4th 1595) And, unless otherwise stipulated by a collective bargaining agreement, upon termination of employment all earned and unused vacation must be paid to the employee at his or her final rate of pay. Labor Code Section 227.3 The California Legislature, in order to ensure that vacation plans were fairly and equitably handled, provided that the Labor Commissioner was to "apply the principles of equity and fairness" in resolving vacation claims.


Yes. DLSE's enforcement policy does not preclude an employer from providing a specific period of time at the beginning of the employment relationship during which an employee does not earn any vacation benefits. This could apply to a probationary or introductory period, and can even apply to the whole first year of employment.


Such a provision in a vacation plan will only be recognized, however, if it is not a subterfuge (phony reason) and in fact, no vacation is implicitly earned or accrued during that first year or other period. For example, a plan with the following provisions would be an obvious subterfuge and not recognized as valid:


In California, because paid vacation is a form of wages, it is earned as labor is performed. An employer's vacation plan may provide for the earning of vacation benefits on a day-by-day, by the week, by the pay period, or some other period basis. For example, an employer's policy may provide that an employee will earn a proportionate share of his or her annual vacation entitlement for each week of a calendar year in which the employee either works at least one full day or receives at least one full days' pay during such week. Thus, for example, if an employee is entitled to two weeks (10 work days) annual vacation, and works full-time, eight hours per day, 40 hours per week, in the above example for each week the employee works at least one full day, he or she will earn 1.538 hours of paid vacation, calculated as follows:


In contrast to how vacation pay may be earned, the calculation of vacation pay for terminating employees (a quit, discharge, death, end of contract, etc.) who have earned and accrued and unused vacation on the books at the time of termination must be prorated on a daily basis and must be paid at the final rate of pay in effect as of the date of the separation. For example, an employee who is entitled to three weeks of annual vacation (15 work days entitlement per year x 8 hours/day = 120 hours vacation entitlement per year) who quits on August 7, 2002 (the 219th day of the year) without having taken any vacation in 2002, who has no vacation carry-over from prior years, and whose final rate of pay is $13.00 per hour, would be entitled to $936.00 vacation pay upon separation, calculated as follows:


Yes, such a provision would be acceptable to the Labor Commissioner. Unlike "use it or lose it" policies, a vacation policy that places a "cap" or "ceiling" on vacation pay accruals is permissible. Whereas a "use it or lose it" policy results in a forfeiture of accrued vacation pay, a "cap" simply places a limit on the amount of vacation that can accrue; that is, once a certain level or amount of accrued vacation is earned but not taken, no further vacation or vacation pay accrues until the balance falls below the cap. The time periods involved for taking vacation must, of course, be reasonable. If implementation of a "cap" is a subterfuge to deny employees vacation or vacation benefits, the policy will not be recognized by the Labor Commissioner.


If the decision is to hold a conference, the parties will be notified by mail of the date, time and place of the conference. The purpose of the conference is to determine the validity of the claim, and to see if the claim can be resolved without a hearing. If the claim is not resolved at the conference, the next step usually is to refer the matter to a hearing or dismiss it for lack of evidence.


If your employer discriminates or retaliates against you in any manner whatsoever, for example, he discharges you because you objected to the fact that your vested vacation was being forfeited and not carried over from year-to-year, or because you file a claim or threaten to file a claim with the Labor Commissioner, you can file a discrimination/retaliation complaint with the Labor Commissioner's Office. In the alternative, you can file a lawsuit in court against your employer.


Experienced workers who are being recruited may be able to negotiate additional vacation time equal to the amount offered by their current employer rather than accepting the amount traditionally awarded to new hires at their target firm.


The FLSA does not require payment for time not worked, such as vacations, sick leave or holidays (Federal or otherwise). These benefits are matters of agreement between an employer and an employee (or the employee's representative).


In general, the FLSA does not require breaks or meal periods be given to workers. However, all employers covered by the FLSA must comply with the Act's break time for nursing mothers provision. Please refer to the Wage and Hour Division's Nursing Mothers website to obtain additional information on this topic. Some states may have additional requirements for breaks or meal periods. If you work in a state which does not require breaks or meal periods, these benefits are a matter of agreement between the employer and the employee (or the employee's representative).


Info

Ti diamo il benvenuto nel gruppo! Qui puoi fare amicizia con...

Membri

Pagina del gruppo: Groups_SingleGroup
bottom of page